Dec 192017
 

Belgium Harbor Antwerp Office Havenhuis Building – maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com

The next JURE Conference 2018 will be held at the University of Antwerp, Belgium. JURE are the JUnior REsearcher (JURE) of the European Association for Learning and Instruction (EARLI).

The theme of the JURE Conference 2018 is “Learning and instruction with an impact – scaling up the skill, will and thrill of learning”. The conference presentations, workshops and keynotes will showcase the newest findings about the cognitive, motivational and emotional aspects of learning and highlight the practical implications for practice and policy.

JURE Conference 2018 Dates:

Conference: 02 – 06 July 2018
Submission NEW Second Roound Deadline (Expanded): 15.04.2018
Registration Open: 01.02.2018
Early Bird Deadline: 03.05.2018

JURE Conference 2018

JURE Conference 2018 Contact:

Website: https://www.uantwerpen.be/en/conferences/jure-2018/
Conference Contact: jure2018.antwerp@gmail.com
Twitter: https://twitter.com/2018JURE #2018
JURE Website: https://www.earli.org/jure
JURE 2018 Flyer can be found here

Dec 162017
 

EARLI SIG Conference Calendar 2018

The calendar for the meetings of the Special Interest Groups (SIG) of EARLI is online!

The European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction (EARLI) is an international networking organisation for junior and senior researchers in education. EARLI has 27 Special Interest Groups representing researchers who study one or more parts and/or aspects of the field of Learning and Instruction.

Find all EARLI SIG Connferences at One Glance here
Find EARLI Flyer on SIG Conferences here

Dec 132017
 

Call for Papers: Mobile Technology, Learning, and Achievement: A Critical Perspective on the Role of Mobile Technology in Education

Mobile Technology Learning

The purpose of this special issue of Contemporary Educational Psychology (CEP) is to rigorously investigate the affordances and challenges of mobile and wearable technologies as platforms for both measuring and inducing processes that foster achievement and learning. Such tools hold great promise as a way to collect online, measures of learner functioning, from non-intrusive biometrics through direct-contact interaction data. They also can serve as educational tools, prompting learners as well as affecting the learning environment. At the same time, mobile technology presents new challenges and new hindrances to effective education, particularly when such technology is used without grounding in learning and learning theory.

Guest editors:
– Matthew L. Bernacki, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
– Jeffrey A. Greene, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
– Helen Crompton, Old Dominion University

Deadline: May 15, 2018
Format: 1-2 page summary
Submit summaries to Matt Bernacki (matt.bernacki@unlv.edu

Source: https://www.journals.elsevier.com/contemporary-educational-psychology/call-for-papers/mobile-technology-learning-and-achievement

Find more research papers here.

Dec 062017
 
International Conference on Motivation 2018

ICM 2018

The next International Conference on Motivation 2018 will be held at Aarhus University, Danish School of Education, Denmark. The chair will be Niels Bonderup Dohn

Summer school: 12th – 14th August 2018 (Sunday – Tuesday)
Application Deadline for Summerschool: 15th January 2018
ICM: 15th – 17th August 2018 (Wednesday – Friday)
NEW Submission Deadline: 15.12.2017
Conference Website: http://conferences.au.dk/icm-2018/
Registration Open: https://events.au.dk/icm-2018/registration
SIG 8 – Motivation & Emotion: http://motivation-emotion.eu
Submission Instructions can be found here

Dec 012017
 
Learning Outcomes

It is creeping back … always.

The Concept of Learning Outcomes Often Follows Behaviourist Tradtion

Learning outcomes as a concept has encountered a revival since the beginning of the Bologna process in 1999. The concept itself has a longer history with its roots in the behaviourist tradition of the 1960s. The goal of this review is to study how the historical roots of learning outcomes are noted in current research articles since the launch of the Bologna process and whether the concept of learning outcomes is used critically or uncritically. The review of 90 articles shows that the behaviourist tradition is still evident in the 21st century research with 29% of the articles directly and 11% indirectly referring uncritically to the respective publications or to the behaviourist epistemology.

Citation: Murtonen, M., Gruber, H., & Lehtinen, E. (2017). The return of behaviourist epistemology: A review of learning outcomes studies. Educational Research Review, 22(Supplement C), 114-128.

Find the full article here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2017.08.001

Find more interesting articles here.

Nov 222017
 

New Measurements of Learning

Call for Papers – Frontline Learning Research – Special Issue

New measurements of learning:
Emerging chances and challenges of process measures.

Deadline: April 15th, 2018

Over the recent years, research within EARLI increasingly focuses on studying learning as a process (how and why does the learning take place?) rather than just the outcomes of learning. As a consequence, process measures, so far used mainly in fundamental research (e.g., eye tracking, EEG), are increasingly being applied to educational science. Process measures make it possible to measure and visualize learning processes as they happen. This application requires the development of novel methodological approaches. The current special issue aims at critically discussing these methods with respect to their explanatory power for researching learning. In research practice, these measures offer researchers many opportunities, but they also raise many challenges. These include combining process measures of different levels of granularity synchronizing measures, capturing the sequential nature of learning processes and defining reasonable epochs for analyses. Often, these challenges go by unnoticed as there is rarely any room to discuss them in traditional empirical study papers. Due to this lack of exchange, researchers often re-invent the wheel.

The contributions to this special issue should include studies on learning that apply these new measurements and put their findings up for discussion. The aim of this special issue is that all contributions reflect on the strengths and limitations of their measures and provide a statement on how informative their data can be for researching learning. The discussants will address these statements and relate the papers to the current state of learning research.

This special issue is based on the initiative of EARLI SIG 14 and EARLI SIG 27. However, all interested researchers are invited to contribute to this special issue. All articles will be thoroughly reviewed according to standards of Frontline Learning Research, an official EARLI journal.

If you are interested in contributing to this call, please send a 300-word abstract to Ellen Kok (e.m.kok@uu.nl) before December 20th, 2017.


The guest editors,
Dr. Christian Harteis
Dr. Halszka Jarodzka
Dr. Ellen Kok

Nov 202017
 
test-taking engagement

Test-taking behavior is influenced by both the to-be assessed competency and individual test-taking engagement. Test-taking behavior is used to draw inferences about competency (response data) and can also be used to judge test-taking engagement (response time data). The expectancy of solving an item successfully and the personal value of taking the test are considered antecedents of test-taking engagement.

Conditioning factors of test‑taking engagement in PIAAC: an exploratory IRT modelling approach considering person and item characteristics

Background

A potential problem of low-stakes large-scale assessments such as the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) is low test-taking engagement. The present study pursued two goals in order to better understand conditioning factors of test-taking disengagement: First, a model-based
approach was used to investigate whether item indicators of disengagement consti-tute a continuous latent person variable by domain. Second, the effects of person and item characteristics were jointly tested using explanatory item response models.

Methods
Analyses were based on the Canadian sample of Round 1 of the PIAAC, with N= 26,683 participants completing test items in the domains of literacy, numeracy, and problem solving. Binary item disengagement indicators were created by means of item response time thresholds.

Results
The results showed that disengagement indicators define a latent dimension by domain. Disengagement increased with lower educational attainment, lower
cognitive skills, and when the test language was not the participant’s native language. Gender did not exert any effect on disengagement, while age had a positive effect for problem solving only. An item’s location in the second of two assessment modules was positively related to disengagement, as was item difficulty. The latter effect was negatively moderated by cognitive skill, suggesting that poor test-takers are especially likely to disengage with more difficult items.

Conclusions:
The negative effect of cognitive skill, the positive effect of item difficulty, and their negative interaction effect support the assumption that disengagement is
the outcome of individual expectations about success (informed disengagement).

Full Article:
Goldhammer, F., Martens, T. & Luedtke, O. (2017). Conditioning factors of test-taking engagement in PIAAC: an exploratory IRT modelling approach considering person and item characteristics. Large-scale Assessments in Education, 5, 18. DOI: 10.1186/s40536-017-0051-9 [html, pdf]

Please find other publications here.

Nov 102017
 


Handbook of Learning Analytics
This new and free Handbook of Learning Analytics covers a broad sprectrum of topics including Emotion (from Sidney D’Mello) and Self-Regulated Learning (from Philip Winne).

This book is edited by Charles Lang, George Siemens, Alyssa Wise & Dragan Gašević

The full book can be downloaded for free here (CC BY 4.0)

Citation: Lang, C., Siemens, G., Wise, A., & Gašević, D. (Eds.). (2017). The Handbook of Learning Analytics. Society for Learning Analytics Research.
ISBN: 978-0-9952408-0-3
DOI: 10.18608/hla17

Find the table of content here.

Nov 082017
 

PSI Theory

Buildung on the central contributions of Julius Kuhl like the PSI Theory leading researchers including Charles S. Carver and Richard M. Ryan reflect the implications for their own work.

This book is edited by Nicola Baumann, Miguel Kazén, Markus Quirin & Sander L. Koole

The first chapter can be dowloaded here.
The book ISBN: 9780889375406 can be bought here.

Citation: Baumann, N., Kazén, M., Quirin, M., & Koole, S. L. (Eds.). (2018). Why People Do the Things They Do. Göttingen: Hogrefe.

Please find the table of content here.

May 012017
 


A New Book on Self-Determination Theory by Ryan & Deci has been released. The Selfdeterminationtheory.Org Homepage offers an initial discount here!

Self-determination theory (SDT) provides a framework for understanding the factors that promote motivation and healthy psychological and behavioral functioning. In this authoritative work, the codevelopers of the theory comprehensively examine SDT’s conceptual underpinnings (including its six mini-theories), empirical evidence base, and practical applications across the lifespan. The volume synthesizes a vast body of research on how supporting—or thwarting—people’s basic needs for competence, relatedness, and autonomy affects their development and well-being. Chapters cover implications for practice and policy in education, health care, psychotherapy, sport, and the workplace.