Dez 012017
 
Learning Outcomes

It is creeping back … always.

The Concept of Learning Outcomes Often Follows Behaviourist Tradtion

Learning outcomes as a concept has encountered a revival since the beginning of the Bologna process in 1999. The concept itself has a longer history with its roots in the behaviourist tradition of the 1960s. The goal of this review is to study how the historical roots of learning outcomes are noted in current research articles since the launch of the Bologna process and whether the concept of learning outcomes is used critically or uncritically. The review of 90 articles shows that the behaviourist tradition is still evident in the 21st century research with 29% of the articles directly and 11% indirectly referring uncritically to the respective publications or to the behaviourist epistemology.

Citation: Murtonen, M., Gruber, H., & Lehtinen, E. (2017). The return of behaviourist epistemology: A review of learning outcomes studies. Educational Research Review, 22(Supplement C), 114-128.

Find the full article here: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.edurev.2017.08.001

Find more interesting articles here.

Aug 032016
 

MotivationsforschungFinden Sie die RSS-Feeds von einigen wichtigen wissenschaftlichen Journalen in den Feldern Motivationsforschung, Lernforschung, Hochschuldidaktik und Lernen mit Computern hier.

Picture by Nicole Henning CC 2.0

  • Frontline Learning Research (EARLI)
  • Motivation and Emotion (Springer)
  • Learning and Instruction (Elsevier)
  • Educational Research Review (Elsevier)
  • Learning and Motivation (Elsevier)
  • Research in Higher Education (Springer)
  • The Inernet and Higher Education (Elsevier)
  • Higher Education (Springer)
  • Studies in Higher Education (Taylor & Francis Online)
  • Learning and Individual Differences (Elsevier)
  • Computers & Education (Elsevier)
  • Educational Psychologist (Taylor & Francis Online
  • Studies in Educational Evaluation (Elsevier)
  • Journal for Educational Research Online (Waxman)
  • Computers in Human Behavior (Elsevier)
  • Jul 262016
     

    Transitions_smallThis chapter discusses transitions towards learning at university from a perspective of regulation processes. The Integrated Model of Learning and Action is used to identity different patterns of motivational regulation amongst first-year students at university by using mixed distribution models. Five subpopulations of motivational regulation could be identified: students with self-determined, pragmatic, strategic, negative and anxious learning motivation. Findings about these patterns can be used to design didactic measures to support students’ learning processes.

    Please find a preview of this chapter here.

    Please cite this chapter as: Martens, T. & Metzger C. (in press). Different Transitions of Learning at University: Exploring the Heterogeneity of Motivational Processes. Erscheint in E. Kyndt, V. Donche, K. Trigwell & S. Lindblom-Ylänne (Eds.), Higher Education Transitions: Theory and Research. EARLI Book Series “New Perspecitves on Learning and Instruction”. London: Routledge.